You Might Not Need That Block

Custom pricing columns with a custom-built WordPress theme and full-site editing.

As I was perusing the WordPress plugin directory this morning, I noticed a new block plugin, which is always one of the highlights of my week. It was a simple pricing block. Of course, I installed it and began playing around with its features. It was a version-1.0 product, so I was not going to fault it for not exceeding any expectations I might have had.

I have little doubt the plugin will meet many users’ needs. However, it did not bring much to the table that users could not already do with stock WordPress. And, as the block system continues to mature with more block options, end-users will gain more design control over every aspect of the existing core blocks.

This is not a knock at this particular plugin. I see less and less need for many third-party blocks the more I browse and test them. With WordPress’s base blocks and a decent theme, many custom solutions are possible via patterns.

To test the plugin’s block, I added it to a Columns block and duplicated it a couple of times to create pricing columns.

The structure of an individual pricing block is straightforward. It contains the equivalent of the following core blocks:

  • Group
  • Heading
  • Heading/Paragraph
  • Heading/Paragraph
  • Paragraph
  • Button(s)
  • Separator
  • List

Since I had the structure, I tried recreating it while using the Twenty Twenty-One theme. I kept everything nearly the same other than a couple of font sizes and colors.

Pricing columns pattern as shown from the Twenty Twenty-One theme.

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This article was written by Justin Tadlock and originally published on WordPress Tavern.

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